Health News

As years have passed, more and more states are legalizing marijuana for medicinal and recreational purposes. While some states allow certain forms of marijuana to be used only for medicinal purposes, other states are open to recreational use of marijuana too!

Before you carry marijuana or use it, look what state you are in and what marijuana law says about how you use it in that particular state. Even if you want to use medical marijuana, you need to follow the law and get yourself doctor’s recommendation to do that.

In this article, we will talk about the states in which medical marijuana is not yet legalized and carrying or using it would put you in deep trouble. You can freely use medical marijuana in Oregon, Colorado, California, or even Washington, but you cannot say anything about the level of legalization of marijuana in other states or the neighboring states.

States Where Marijuana is Illegal:

In some states, marijuana is legal up to a certain extent and in others, it is completely illegal. Let us find out what states has not yet legalized marijuana.

There are some states that only allow marijuana in the form of CBD.

CBD, also known as, Cannabidiol, is nothing but the oil extracted from the cannabis flower. These have medicinal values that can treat major degrees of chronic pain. However, in these states, there are CBD laws that rule the degree of usage of CBD. You need to have a licensed and qualified physician’s recommendation and the qualified ailments in order to use CBD in these states.

  • Alabama
  • Georgia
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kentucky
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

There are few states that allow marijuana usage up to a certain extent and also allow CBD to be used for medical purpose. In these states, there are highly any chances of you getting arrested if you are found with marijuana. However, you will be fined based on the amount of marijuana you have in your possession at the time of inspection.

  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • North Carolina

Nebraska is a state where marijuana has been decriminalized to some extent. However, no CBD is allowed here.Certain states are yet to open themselves to legalizing marijuana. In these states, you may get arrested and possibly would be jailed if you are found guilty of possessing marijuana in any form.

  • Idaho
  • Kansas
  • South Dakota

You must know that marijuana decriminalized states do not entirely rule out arrests for possessing marijuana. If you are found in possession of marijuana in any amount more than ¼ oz, you could very likely end up being arrested or possibly serve jail time.

What Would Happen if You Are Caught In Possession of Marijuana in a Non-Legalized State of America?

If you get caught with marijuana in a non-legalized state, you will get imprisoned! There are many states where people have changed their mindset towards the possession of marijuana. People still get arrested in some parts of the country, while in others, they simply have to pay fine.“While thousands of people are still getting arrested and hit with small-time misdemeanors, statistics are showing that fewer people are serving [marijuana-related] jail time.”

However, this does not give you reasons to possess marijuana in a non-legalized state of US. Let’s look at the amount of marijuana you must possess in order to be charged with a felony.

  • Alabama: More than 35.27 oz (this is only for the first-time charge. The second time you will be charged with a felony no matter what quantity you possess)
  • Idaho: More than 3 oz
  • Iowa: Any amount of possession or even possession of marijuana is considered misdemeanor
  • Indiana: more than 1.05 oz (or ANY amount for a second offense)
  • Georgia: More than 1 oz
  • Nebraska: More than 16 oz
  • Kentucky: More than 8 oz
  • Missouri: More than 1.23 oz
  • Kansas: First-time possession will be a misdemeanor and all second-time possession will be considered a felony
  • Mississippi: More than 1.05 oz
  • Utah: More than 16 oz
  • South Carolina: More than 1 oz
  • North Carolina: More than 1.5 oz
  • Texas: More than 4 oz
  • South Dakota: More than 2 oz
  • Wisconsin: First-time possession of marijuana in any amount will be a misdemeanor and all second-time possession will be considered a felony
  • Tennessee: More than ½ oz
  • Wyoming: More than 3 oz

We can see from the above table that some states are too strict about possession of marijuana. Even a small quantity of marijuana in your pocket can land you in jail.

Even after decriminalizing marijuana in the majority of the portion of the United States, we still see that the annual arrests made for possession of marijuana are more than the arrests made in a year for violent crimes.…

Health News

The HNC launched in October 2010 out of shared concern that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans were not having the intended impact on rates of obesity and other chronic diseases. The ongoing focus of the Guidelines has been to prevent chronic disease; however, the science indicates that there is no general dietary pattern that can accomplish this across a diverse population. Prevention of chronic disease through dietary and lifestyle modification is best left to healthcare practitioners and their individual patients. Our position is that the Guidelines must return their focus to ensuring that Americans meet their complete nutritional needs at all stages of life. To accomplish this, the Coalition seeks to educate and assist healthcare professionals, policy makers, legislators, and the public.

In addition, we are creating a coalition of supporters to speak out against the direction the Guidelines have been taking since their inception in 1980, and to offer this alternative approach. Our membership is broad-based and includes scientists, healthcare professionals, members of the food and agricultural community, health advocacy groups, and most of all, concerned citizens.

To help achieve our goals, in 2015 we composed a letter that we delivered to the Secretaries of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services, selected policymakers, and interested media outlets.  The letter is copied below (with a link to the pdf as well).  If you wish to sign on, please use this quick form to add your information to the letter.

We are adding to the momentum building in the national media and among other health advocacy organizations demanding that our policy makers critically examine the process used to develop the DGA. We suggest a slightly different approach – we have as our primary goal changing the focus of  future Guidelines to that of ensuring adequate nutrition for all Americans.

Ultimately, we hope to positively impact our food, nutrition, and health systems by developing an understanding and awareness of the social, cultural, and economic forces that not only impact American’s access to nutritional information and to the foods needed to support health, but shape American’s attitudes about nutrition and relationships to food.

I encourage you to share this with friends and colleagues whom you feel may be interested in this critically important issue.…